After the Flood


By William A. Mayer, Editor & Publisher - PipeLineNews.org

September 6, 2005 - San Francisco, CA - PipeLineNews - Our species always looks for meaning in disastrous events. It's as if the human need to make sense of nature's random acts can - by force of will alone - create lessons not necessarily in evidence, and therefore soften the blow of conditions beyond our control.

There are however some great truths to be learned from the devastation of Katrina, though they are not very reassuring.

This event has the look of an accident scene; a grinding head-on between the social engineers and the test tube culture they were responsible for creating. In detail the video streams out; a constellation of glass shards litter skyward, then rain down - falling hard - before flood-waters of Biblical proportions consume all.

Much of what you will read about this event will be bilge, because on the surface at least, this is mostly about Black folks, and if people lie about sex, they certainly lie about the embittered relations between Black and Caucasian society.

As we attempt to come to some conclusions regarding the breakdown of society in New Orleans it might be helpful to invoke an analogy.

In mechanical engineering there is a specialty that involves materials testing and modeling. It purpose is to stress-test building and other materials to the breaking point, assaying such things as shear-strength and elasticity of various substances. This process is vital because it gives structural engineers the information that they need to construct for example, safe buildings, bridges or even levees.

New Orleans has just been subjected to this type of testing, involuntarily and by natural processes, not man-made.

It should not have been surprising to find that given sufficient power, a hurricane could overwhelm the physical infrastructure in a city like New Orleans that had been designed to provide a limited amount of protection against encroachment by water.

In similar fashion many cities wait to die, though by different means; San Francisco sitting atop the San Andreas fault, being among them.

What was unexpected is the way in which the population reacted to that disaster - a total social breakdown and massive uncontrolled looting - with militias of gun toting thugs marauding the streets and committing indiscriminate acts of violence.

In that sense New Orleans did more than simply break under testing, it turned inward on itself, assumed critical mass then detonated in response to the crisis.

This response indicates that New Orleans was an unstable society to begin with, always on the brink.

But the experimental testing of a region is only one aspect of this living laboratory; another experiment - the one which produced places like New Orleans - started far earlier and it did not just involve that city.

It involves all of America and centers on a downward spiraling deviation from traditionalism.

But how does an established society become unhinged from its past?

What force could wield sufficient power?

The only one which has the authority to tax on a national basis and through legislative, executive and judicial fiat direct the course of society - the federal government.

One looks for a watershed of causation under such circumstances. The question arises how far back to go?

Do we go back to the Lincoln administration and the Civil War, a period which firmly and permanently elevated the role of the federal government?

Or FDR's dabbling in alphabet-soup socialism, the New Deal?

Or maybe the Second World War, a time when nearly all of American enterprise fell under the domination of Washington, albeit for noble purpose?

While all of these might be considered of import we believe that the most direct cause for what we are today viewing with alarm in a small rural Southern state has its roots in Lyndon Johnson's social programs, which permanently and negatively left their mark.

Robert Rector, of the Heritage Foundation, is probably the greatest authority on Johnson's grandiose scheme - the Great Society, he writes [emphasis added]:

"When President Lyndon Johnson launched the War on Poverty more than 30 years ago, he announced that it was an investment that would repay its cost to society many times over. Since that time, the United States has invested some $7.9 trillion in programs that provide cash, food, housing, and medical and social services to poor and low-income Americans. But while the nation was pouring this flood of resources into the War on Poverty most social problems got worse, not better. A deluge of illegitimacy, crime, drug abuse, and welfare dependency besieged American communities. The war on poverty failed." - Broadening The Reform, The Heritage Foundation, 2000 - Robert Rector

As Rector so rightly observes what we call poverty in the United States today is not classical poverty, today's poor drive new cars, do not go hungry, have access to medical care, own numerous color televisions and often own their own homes which are not in disrepair.

What affects today's poor is entrapment in a culture that encourages "...behavioral poverty...that heavily reinforced illegitimacy, divorce and non-work."

Though this culture directly and primarily affects people of color, the larger society has been injured by it also, in the form of a general debasement of standards, loss of hope and an encouragement of social deviancy.

Upon examination, New Orleans was already broken before it was "tested."

In the 2003 FBI Violent Crime Summary New Orleans earns the distinction as the murder capital of the United States with a homicide rate of 25.5 per 100,0001 - the highest in any major American city.

And lest you draw the incorrect conclusion, that it's only the poorest, most deprived segment of this city which has driven the crime rate, be mindful that the U.S. Dept. of Justice has assigned a special taskforce to attempt to remedy the rampant corruption and lawlessness within the New Orleans police department.

This agency has amassed the unenviable reputation as being out of control. It has seen its officers convicted of high-profile crimes including a 1994 case involving murder-for-hire and a 1995 case in which a New Orleans police [March 4, 1995, New Orleans police officer Antoinette Frank] officer was convicted of robbing a Vietnamese restaurant and then coldly executing three witnesses to the crime.

Actually, Frank failed her mental exam for the department, but retained her own "expert" psychologist whom she employed to brow beat the department into hiring her, with disastrous results.

But isn't this exactly what we have come to expect from a system which no longer has clear standards and can so easily be manipulated by pimps, in this case those invoking government sponsored bigotry?

This bigotry is all encompassing and gushes from fresh wounds created daily by judicial edict. Hence we legally deny that we are a Judeo-Christian nation, but we send little children home from school with extra credit assignments requiring them to fast...for Ramadan.

Said another way, the Johnson years institutionalized multiculturalism and perverse diversity, and the graphic pictures we see coming out of New Orleans are an outgrowth of a society which was and remains intensely and negatively mis-directed by the social legislation of that period.

Notes:

1. 2003 FBI Violent Crime Summary

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